Great Britain, the dominant industrial and maritime power of the 19th century, played a leading role in developing parliamentary democracy and in advancing literature and science. At its zenith, the British Empire stretched over one-fourth of the earth's surface. The first half of the 20th century saw the UK's strength seriously depleted in two World Wars. The second half witnessed the dismantling of the Empire and the UK rebuilding itself into a modern and prosperous European nation. The UK currently is weighing the degree of its integration with continental Europe. A member of the EU, it chose to remain outside of the EMU for the time being. Constitutional reform is also a significant issue in the UK. Regional assemblies with varying degrees of power opened in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland in 1999. - US CIA World Factbook.


Martel Prototype---Morris Martel
Martel, Morris-Martel One Man Tankette

The idea was never put to test and so the inter-war years were that of "what will happen next?". Some ideas were good, much was fantasy - as was this idea.

A theory was put forward by the great French tank enthusiast General Estienne, who helped design France's first tank and a proponent of the light tank, of the idea of skirmishers armed with light tanks rushing an enemy position. The idea was that the massive onslaught by a high speed, protected group of soldiers would be unstoppable in action. Col. (Later Major General) J.F.C. Fuller revived the idea after WW1 and a debate began. Major (later Lt. General) Sir Gifford Le. Q. Martel undertook the idea and in 1925 built the tankette shown above in his garage. The engine came from a Maxwell and the axel came from a Ford truck. The tracks came from the Roadless Traction Company. The body was made from wood. After a demonstration to the War Office, authorization was obtained for Morris Commercial Motors to build 4 test models. The first was delivered in 1926. In 1927 eight more machines were ordered and were to be used as scout machines of a new experimental force being formed. The idea was dropped shortly after that period as it was found that a single man had difficulty operating these machines and firing a weapon at the same time. One machine was tested with a single rear tire for steering.

Specifications (Martel)
Crew 1
Weight ?
Length 8'
Width 4.5'
Height 5'
Armor none
Powerplant Maxwell
Armament ?
Performance 20mph (road) 6mph (off road)
Range ?
Specifications (Morris Martel)
Crew 1
Weight 2.2 tons
Length 9.1'
Width 3.4'
Height 4.1'
Armor ?
Powerplant Morris 16hp
Armament ?
Performance 15mph (road) 10mph (off road)
Range ?

Morris Martel 2 Man Tankette---Morris-Martel Two Man Tankette
Morris-Martel Two Man Tankette

More of the same here! This was an idea to squeeze all the possibilities out of the design. Basically this was better than the first unit as far as human (ergonomics) conditions go.

Specifications
Crew 2
Weight 2.75 tons
Length 9.1'
Width 4.7'
Height 5.6'
Armor ?
Powerplant Morris 16hp
Armament 1 x Light MG
Performance 10mph (off road) 15mph (road)
Range ?

Crossley Martel One Man Tankette---Crossley-Martel One Man Tankette
Crossley-Martel One Man Tankette

Here, Crossley gets in on the idea. During 1927 the Martel idea was tried at Crossley with a few orginal ideas. A Citroen-Kegresse was fitted as was rubber tracks.

Specifications
Crew 1
Weight 1.8 tons
Length 10'
Width 4.9'
Height 5.4'
Armor .4"
Powerplant Crossley 14hp
Armament 1 x Light MG
Performance 18.6mph
Range ?

Carden-Loyd One Man Tankette
Carden-Loyd One Man Tankette

Publicity caused the Carden-Loyd Tractors LTD firm to get involved. This vehicle, built at Kensington in 1925 was presented to the War Office. The War Office then ordered one test vehicle built.


Carden Loyd Mark1---Carden Loyd Mark1* (Star)
Carden-Loyd Mark I, Mark I* (Star) One Man Tankette

This was simply the next version to come from Carden-Loyd. The Mark I* was an attempt to increase speed and track life.

Specifications (Star Only)
Crew 1
Weight 1.6 tons
Length 10' 5"
Width 4' 6"
Height 4' 10"
Armor 6 - 9mm
Powerplant Ford Model T 14hp
Armament 1 x MG (light)
Performance 31mph (wheels) 15mph (tracks)
Range ?

Carden-Loyd Mark II One Man Tankette
Carden-Loyd Mark II One Man Tankette

The vehicle was the same as the Mark I with the exception of a new track suspension layout. Replacing the 14 steel road wheels was 4 rubber bogies.


(no picture)
Carden-Loyd Mark III One Man Tankette

The vehicle was the same as the Mark I* with the exception of a new track suspension layout. Replacing the 14 steel road wheels was 4 rubber bogies.


Carden-Loyd Two Man Tankette
Carden-Loyd Two Man Tankette

In 1926, as the interest in the one man tankette began to die out, Carden-Loyd produced this two man tankette. This vehicle did not have a "Mark" assigned to it.


Carden-Loyd Mark IV Two Man Tankette
Carden-Loyd Mark IV Two Man Tankette

The second version of the Two Man Tankette. The suspension was later modified to the addition of  5 return rollers on each side. The vehicle was armed with a .5" Vickers Heavy MG.


Carden-Loyd Mark V Two Man Tankette---Carden-Loyd Mark V Tankette. Note the King of England in the background.
Carden-Loyd Mark V Two Man Tankette

Eight were ordered in conjunction with the eight ordered from Morris-Martel (see the first entry above). Nearly the same as the Mark IV. This unit varied in that it was fitted with a tricycle wheel and track device.

Specifications
Crew 2
Weight 1.13 tons
Length 9' 11"
Width 6' 6"
Height 3' 4"
Armor 6 - 9mm
Powerplant Ford Model T 22.5hp
Armament 1 x Vickers .303 MG
Performance 31mph (wheels) 22mph (tracks)
Range ?

Carden-Loyd Mark VI Two Man Tankette
Carden-Loyd Mark VI Two Man Tankette

One of the most famous vehicles in the history of armor, and the father of an entire generation of armor worldwide. Purchased throughout the world, reproduced, copied, studied, this vehicle gave spawn to a host of ideas, and a false sense of safety and power to many nations who relied on these vehicles in WW2. Great Britain was one of the few nations to more properly see the role of this light vehicle. Nations that used, copied, and varied on this design (with and without license) were: France (UE series), Italy (CV series), USSR (T27), Poland (TK series), Czechoslovakia (MU4). Dozens more nations simply had Carden-Loyd manufacture the vehicle to their own specifications.

Specifications
Crew 2
Weight 1.5 tons
Length 8' 1"
Width 5' 7"
Height 4'
Armor 6 - 9mm
Powerplant Ford Model T 40hp
Armament 1 x Vickers .303 or .5 MG
Performance 28mph
Range ?

?
Carden-Loyd Mark VIA Tankette

(no data)


ohoh

guestbook

Last Update: Thursday, February 13, 2003