Sometimes this tank is called Chi-Ro in error. Chi-Ro is an American moniker for this tank.
Type 89 Yi-Go (Chi-Ro) Medium Tank

Specifications
Weight 12.7 tons
Length 4.38m
Width 2.05m
Height 2.18m
Clearance .4m
Crew 4
Armor 10 to 17mm
Armament One 57mm Type 90, 2 x 6.5mm Type 91 MG
Ammunition 100 rounds (47mm), 2745 rounds (7.7mm)
Speed 24.75 mph
Range 99 miles
Engine 120hp water cooled 6cyl Mitsubishi gasoline

Type 89 Otsu (I-Go) Tank---Type 89 Otsu (I-Go) Tank Model A---Type 89 Otsu (I-Go) Tank Model B

Type 89 Otsu (I-Go) Tank---Type 89 Otsu (I-Go) Tank---Type 89 Otsu (I-Go) Tank - a rare color photograph. Most Japanese photos are in black and white.

Type 89 Otsu (I-Go) Tank---Type 89 Medium Tanks of the First Company, 7th Tank Regiment move forward toward Manila the Philippines in December 1941.---Photo taken in 1989 at Aberdeen Proving Grounds. - Photo research by Dr. Georg V. Rauch. Photo courtesy of Dr. André Louis Maurois.
Type 89 Otsu (I-Go) Tank

Type 89 Medium's codename was "I-Go". I-Go's design refered to the Vickers Medium C Tank which was the basis for the Type 89. Only one Vickers Medium C Tank was ever imported. Japanese planners decided to produce their own version at home using an air-cooled diesel instead of the Vickers gasoline engine. Major Tomio Hara developed the unique bell crank suspension used in this model. Variants included the SS-Ki Engineer tank.

Specifications
Value Model A Model B
Weight 13 tons 15 tons
Length 19' 3" 23'
Width 7' 1" 7' 1"
height 8.5' 8' 6"
Clearance 19" 19"
Crew 4 4
Armor 6 to 17 mm 6 to 17 mm
Armament One 57 mm, 1 MG One 57 mm, 2 MG
Engine 120 hp 160 hp
Speed 15 mph 20 mph
Range 100 miles ?
Obstacles Trench: 8' 3"
Step: 2' 9"
Ford: 3' 3"
Trench: 9'
Step: 2' 9"
Ford: 3' 3"

Type 92 Heavy Armored Tank---Type 92 Heavy Armored Tank---Type 92 Heavy Armored Tank
Type 92 Heavy Armored Car, Type 92 Light Tank "Ju-Sokosha"

This model offered an improved suspension. Model 92 was deployed to the Cavalry. The Type 92 Light Tank was officially classified as a heavy armored car. In western sources it has been listed both as a heavy tankette or as a light tank. Western records also list it as a Combat Car. This vehicle was designed for the Cavalry. The early designs called for wheeled armored car, because of terrain conditions/considerations, the design was changed to a tracked version. The Combat Car had 4 versions. The Prototype, the early production, the late production, and a amphibious version called the Type 92 A-I-GO. The main difference between the early and late production models was in the running gear. The earlier running gear tended to breakdown. The late production model had larger spoked rubber tired wheels.

Specifications
- Prototype Early model Improved model
Weight 3.2 tons 3.5 tons 3.5 tons
Length ? 12.85' 12.85'
Width ? 5.33' 5.33'
Height ? 6.04' 6.04'
Clearance ? 15" 15"
Crew 3 3 3
Armor 6mm 6mm 6mm
Speed 25 mph 21.6 mph 21.6 mph
Range ? ? ?
Engine Ishikawajima air cooled 6cyl 45hp Gasoline Ishikawajima air cooled 6cyl 45hp Gasoline Ishikawajima air cooled 6cyl 45hp Gasoline

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Type 92 Tankette

This tank, though often referred to in western texts, never really existed. The name came about from wrongly identified early Type 94 TK Tankettes.


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Type 93 Light Tank

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Type 94 Medium Tank

At times some books will refer to a Type 94 Medium Tank in the Japanese inventory. Careful research has found this label to be an error. The Type 94 Medium Tank is the Type 89 Medium Tank Otsu.


model92.jpg (34432 bytes)---Model 94 Tankette "TK"---Model 94 Tankette "TK"---Type-94 diesel powered prototype

Model 94 Tankette "TK"---Type-94 with it's trailer---Type94 in Nanking, China.

The Model 94 had 2 special (and sinister) trailers built for it - both dealt with biological and chemical weapons. One administered agents for an attack, the other provided defense. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-car, square in appearance was a de-gas or defensive type. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-poison-car (tapered) was the attack version. Both of these appear connected with chemical warfare. There is also reference to two other sub versions of these trailers - "94 shiki Ko-Go kesi-sha" (erase-car) and the "94 shiki shoudoku-sha" (disinfections-car). As best as can be determined, these versions were the same trailers, but loaded with different materials designed for biological warfare. The trailer's "fog" generator for spreading the agents was inside the tankette as can be observed by the hose link. It appears that the notorious Japanese unit 774 was deeply involved with this design. Though not used in combat with western sources (to our knowledge), it is believed that it was tried on Chinese prisoners but dismissed because it required a very close range and the time it took to kill a human took far too long to be effective. There is further reference to a flame-thrower version of one of these trailers, but, it was never produced. - Photo provided by T. Kanda---The Model 94 had 2 special (and sinister) trailers built for it - both dealt with biological and chemical weapons. One administered agents for an attack, the other provided defense. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-car, square in appearance was a de-gas or defensive type. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-poison-car (tapered) was the attack version. Both of these appear connected with chemical warfare. There is also reference to two other sub versions of these trailers - "94 shiki Ko-Go kesi-sha" (erase-car) and the "94 shiki shoudoku-sha" (disinfections-car). As best as can be determined, these versions were the same trailers, but loaded with different materials designed for biological warfare. The trailer's "fog" generator for spreading the agents was inside the tankette as can be observed by the hose link. It appears that the notorious Japanese unit 774 was deeply involved with this design. Though not used in combat with western sources (to our knowledge), it is believed that it was tried on Chinese prisoners but dismissed because it required a very close range and the time it took to kill a human took far too long to be effective. There is further reference to a flame-thrower version of one of these trailers, but, it was never produced. - Photo provided by T. Kanda---The Model 94 had 2 special (and sinister) trailers built for it - both dealt with biological and chemical weapons. One administered agents for an attack, the other provided defense. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-car, square in appearance was a de-gas or defensive type. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-poison-car (tapered) was the attack version. Both of these appear connected with chemical warfare. There is also reference to two other sub versions of these trailers - "94 shiki Ko-Go kesi-sha" (erase-car) and the "94 shiki shoudoku-sha" (disinfections-car). As best as can be determined, these versions were the same trailers, but loaded with different materials designed for biological warfare. The trailer's "fog" generator for spreading the agents was inside the tankette as can be observed by the hose link. It appears that the notorious Japanese unit 774 was deeply involved with this design. Though not used in combat with western sources (to our knowledge), it is believed that it was tried on Chinese prisoners but dismissed because it required a very close range and the time it took to kill a human took far too long to be effective. There is further reference to a flame-thrower version of one of these trailers, but, it was never produced. - Photo provided by T. Kanda---

The Model 94 had 2 special (and sinister) trailers built for it - both dealt with biological and chemical weapons. One administered agents for an attack, the other provided defense. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-car, square in appearance was a de-gas or defensive type. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-poison-car (tapered) was the attack version. Both of these appear connected with chemical warfare. There is also reference to two other sub versions of these trailers - "94 shiki Ko-Go kesi-sha" (erase-car) and the "94 shiki shoudoku-sha" (disinfections-car). As best as can be determined, these versions were the same trailers, but loaded with different materials designed for biological warfare. The trailer's "fog" generator for spreading the agents was inside the tankette as can be observed by the hose link. It appears that the notorious Japanese unit 774 was deeply involved with this design. Though not used in combat with western sources (to our knowledge), it is believed that it was tried on Chinese prisoners but dismissed because it required a very close range and the time it took to kill a human took far too long to be effective. There is further reference to a flame-thrower version of one of these trailers, but, it was never produced. - Photo provided by T. Kanda---The Model 94 had 2 special (and sinister) trailers built for it - both dealt with biological and chemical weapons. One administered agents for an attack, the other provided defense. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-car, square in appearance was a de-gas or defensive type. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-poison-car (tapered) was the attack version. Both of these appear connected with chemical warfare. There is also reference to two other sub versions of these trailers - "94 shiki Ko-Go kesi-sha" (erase-car) and the "94 shiki shoudoku-sha" (disinfections-car). As best as can be determined, these versions were the same trailers, but loaded with different materials designed for biological warfare. The trailer's "fog" generator for spreading the agents was inside the tankette as can be observed by the hose link. It appears that the notorious Japanese unit 774 was deeply involved with this design. Though not used in combat with western sources (to our knowledge), it is believed that it was tried on Chinese prisoners but dismissed because it required a very close range and the time it took to kill a human took far too long to be effective. There is further reference to a flame-thrower version of one of these trailers, but, it was never produced. - Photo provided by T. Kanda---The Model 94 had 2 special (and sinister) trailers built for it - both dealt with biological and chemical weapons. One administered agents for an attack, the other provided defense. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-car, square in appearance was a de-gas or defensive type. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-poison-car (tapered) was the attack version. Both of these appear connected with chemical warfare. There is also reference to two other sub versions of these trailers - "94 shiki Ko-Go kesi-sha" (erase-car) and the "94 shiki shoudoku-sha" (disinfections-car). As best as can be determined, these versions were the same trailers, but loaded with different materials designed for biological warfare. The trailer's "fog" generator for spreading the agents was inside the tankette as can be observed by the hose link. It appears that the notorious Japanese unit 774 was deeply involved with this design. Though not used in combat with western sources (to our knowledge), it is believed that it was tried on Chinese prisoners but dismissed because it required a very close range and the time it took to kill a human took far too long to be effective. There is further reference to a flame-thrower version of one of these trailers, but, it was never produced. - Photo provided by T. Kanda---The Model 94 had 2 special (and sinister) trailers built for it - both dealt with biological and chemical weapons. One administered agents for an attack, the other provided defense. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-car, square in appearance was a de-gas or defensive type. The Type 94 Mk. I spray-poison-car (tapered) was the attack version. Both of these appear connected with chemical warfare. There is also reference to two other sub versions of these trailers - "94 shiki Ko-Go kesi-sha" (erase-car) and the "94 shiki shoudoku-sha" (disinfections-car). As best as can be determined, these versions were the same trailers, but loaded with different materials designed for biological warfare. The trailer's "fog" generator for spreading the agents was inside the tankette as can be observed by the hose link. It appears that the notorious Japanese unit 774 was deeply involved with this design. Though not used in combat with western sources (to our knowledge), it is believed that it was tried on Chinese prisoners but dismissed because it required a very close range and the time it took to kill a human took far too long to be effective. There is further reference to a flame-thrower version of one of these trailers, but, it was never produced. - Photo provided by T. Kanda
Model 94 Tankette "TK"

Model 94 Tankette had a codename, "TK", which means "Tokushu (Special) Ken-in sha (Tractor)". The TK's true purpose was to pull the supply/toxic gas/bleaching powder (to counteract toxins) trailer.

In the late 1920's, the Japanese purchased six British Carden-Loyd Mark machine-gun carriers, and two Mark Vlb carriers for testing. As a result of trials the Japanese decided to develop a small vehicle in Japan based on what was learned. The prototype was built in 1933-34 by the Tokyo Gas and Electric Industry (later known as Hino Motors) and after trials in both China and Japan it was standardized as the Type 94 tankette. Oddly, American sources have always referred to it as the Type 92 tankette.

The hull of the tankette used a riveted construction, with the engine and driver at the front and the small turret at the rear of the hull. A large door was provided in the rear of the hull so that stores could be loaded. Armament consisted of a single 6.5mm machine-gun in a turret with manual traverse. The suspension was designed by Major Tomio Hara and was similar to most Japanese tanks. It consisted of four bogies, two on each side. These were suspended by bell-cranks resisted by armored compression springs placed horizontally, one each side of the hull, externally. Each bogie had two small rubber-tired road wheels with the drive sprocket at the front and the idler at the rear. There were two track-return rollers. When in service, the Type 94 was found to be very prone to throwing its tracks when it made a high speed turn. Further redesign work was carried out on the suspension and the small idler was replaced by a larger idler, which was now on the ground... it did not solve the problem. An air-cooled gasoline motor that developed 35hp @ 2,500rpm powered the tank. Armament initially consisted of a single Type 91 6.5mm machine gun, although in later model this was replaced by a single 7.7mm machine gun. Some appear to have been fitted with a 37mm gun, but this is unconfirmed.

The primary role of the Type 94 was to carry supplies in the battlefield area but it was often used in the reconnaissance role for which it was totally unsuited as its armor could be penetrated by ordinary rifle bullets. In 1936, each Japanese Infantry Division had a Tankette Company that had 6 Type 94s, for use in reconnaissance role. It was often used to tow a tracked ammunition trailer in a fashion similar to the British and French tankettes of this period. The Type 97 replaced the Type 92 in service. There was also a chemical/biological trailer constructed for this tank.

Specifications (early model)
Weight 3 Tons
Length 10' 3"
Width 5' 3"
Height 5' 4"
Clearance 13.5"
Crew 2
Armor 6 to 14 mm
Armament One 6.5mm MG
Ammunition 1980 rounds
Engine 4cyl, 32 hp, gasoline
Transmission 4 forward, 1 reverse
Speed 25 mph
Range 100 miles
Obstacles Trench: 4.5'
Step: 2' 1"
Ford: 2'
Specifications (late model)
Weight 3.4 tons
Length 11'
Width 5' 3"
Height 5' 4"
Clearance 1'
Crew 2
Armor 4 to 12 mm
Armament One 7.7mm MG
Ammunition 1980 rounds
Speed 26 mph
Range 100 miles
Engine 32 hp
Obstacles Trench: 4.5'
Ford: 2'

Model 95 Ha-Go Light Tank---Model 95 Ha-Go Light Tank---Model 95 Ha-Go Light Tank
Model 95 Ha-Go Light Tank---Model 95 Ha-Go Light Tank in Burma.---Type 95 at the  Patton Museum in 1991. - Bill Kirk's private collection---Type95 HaGo seen here in China.

Model 95 Ha-Go Light Tank

The Type 95 was developed to meet the requirements of the Japanese army in the early 1930's. The first two prototypes were completed in 1934 by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. These were tested in China and Japan and finally standardized as the Type 95. Mitsubishi called the tank Ha-Go, but the army called the tank "Kyuu-Go" which simply means 95 (due to misunderstanding, this is sometimes spelled as Ka-Go). Over 1100 were completed before production ended in 1943. However, there is a possibility that the tank remained in production until 1945. This source is unconfirmed. In 1943 a few Type 95 were modified to carry the 57mm cannon as fitted to the Type 97. This tank was called the Ke-Ri. The Ke-Ri was not successful owing to the cramped turret. It was then decided to modify the turret ring and place a Type 97 turret on a Type 95. This new tank was called the Ke-Nu. The type 95 was a useful vehicle in China but met it's operational end when facing the M4 Sherman and American anti tank equipment.

Specifications
Weight 10 tons
Length 14' 4"
Height 7'
Width 6' 9"
Clearance  15.5'
Crew 3
Armor 6 to 12 mm
Armament One 37 mm, 2 MG
Engine 110 hp
Transmission 4 forward, 1 reverse
Speed 28 mph
Obstacles Trench: 6'
Step: 2' 8"
Ford: 3' 3"

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Type 95 Kyo-Go Light Tank

At times some books will refer to a Type 95 Kyo-Go Light Tank in the Japanese inventory. Careful research has found this label to be an error. "Kyu Go" means 95 in Japanese. Somebody seems to have misunderstood it as a nickname. Any reference to this name is actually referring to the Model 95 Ha-Go Light Tank.


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Type 95 Ke-Go Light Tank

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Type 95 Ke-Ri Light Tank

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Type 95 Keni Light Tank

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Type 95 So-Ki Rail Tank

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Type 95 Ke-Nu Rail Tank

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Type 95 Ri-Ki Tank Recovery Vehicle

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Type 95 Heavy Tank
Type 95 Heavy Tank

The Type 95 was the final version of the Japanese multi-turret designs. The front sub-turret housed a 37mm gun, while the main turret held a 70mm gun facing forward and a 6.5mm machine gun in the rear. The tank also had a rear-facing sub-turret armed with a 6.5mm machine gun. The armor was of riveted construction running from 12mm to 30mm in thickness. The tank ran on 9 leaf sprung road wheels supported by 4 return rollers. The rear sprocket drove the tracks. The engine was gasoline driven (Aircraft Type, 6 cylinders, liquid cooled) and developed 290hp which resulted in the top speed of 13.7 mph. Only one pilot model was built in 1934.

Specifications
Armor 12 to 30mm
Length 21.25'
Width 8.8'
Height 9.5'
Armament 1 x 70mm gun 1 x 37mm gun 2 x 6.5mm MG
Engine Aircraft Type 6 cyl liquid cooled 290hp
Transmission  4 forward, 1 reverse
Speed 13.7 mph

Type 97 Te-Ke Tankette---Type 97 Te-Ke Tankette---Type 97 Te-Ke Tankette - This photo gives a relative view of this tank's diminutive size!---A type 97 seen here in China during 1933. - Photo contribution by Xin Hui.
Type 97 Te-Ke Tankette

A variant of the Te-Ke was the Type 98 APC "So-Da". So-Da was designed as ammunition carrier.

Specifications
Weight 4.5 tons
Length 12'
Width 6'
Height 6'
Clearance 14"
Crew 2
Armor 4 to 12 mm
Armament One 37 mm cannon
Ammunition 96 rounds
Transmission  4 forward, 1 reverse
Speed 24 mph
Range 100 miles
Obstacles Trench: 5' 3"
Ford: 2.5'

Type 97 Chi-Ha Medium Tank---Type 97 Chi-Ha Medium Tank---Type 97 Chi-Ha Medium Tank
Type 97 Chi-Ha Medium Tank

Some 3000 vehicles were produced by Mitsubishi during this model's "run". The following specialized tanks were produced: recovery, flail mine clearers, engineer, bridge layers, 20mm and 75mm anti-aircraft, and self propelled guns. These vehicles made very little impact on daily operations owing to their small numbers. Late in the war the Navy installed a 120mm gun in a limited number of these tanks.

Specifications
Weight 15 tons
Length 18'
Width 7' 8"
Height 7' 8"
Clearance 16"
Crew 4
Armor 8 to 25 mm
Armament One 57 mm, 2 MG
Engine  12cyl diesel, 150 hp
Transmission 4 forward, 1 reverse
Speed 25 mph
Obstacles Trench: 8' 3"
Step: 2.5'
Ford: 3' 3"

Type 97 Chi-Ni---Type 97 Chi-Ni---Type 97 Chi-Ni
Type 97 Chi-Ni

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type97-shiki.jpg (23823 bytes)
Type 97 Shi-Ki Command Tank

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Type 97 w/47mm Cannon Shinhoto-Chi-Ha---Type 97 w/47mm Cannon Shinhoto-Chi-Ha---Type 97 w/47mm Cannon Shinhoto-Chi-Ha---Type 97 w/47mm Cannon Shinhoto-Chi-Ha
Type 97 w/47mm Cannon Shinhoto-Chi-Ha
Also known as a Type 97 "special"

From 1942 onwards, the Model 97 was armed with the high velocity 47 mm cannon. This model was also known as the Shinhoto Chi-Ha. Mounting this cannon required a larger turret design. This design was probably the best tank Japan produced up to 1945. The term Shinhoto means "new turret". When developing Type 97 Medium Tank, "Chi" was first used as the code name of the medium tank. Because the Type 97 was a third medium tank (previous two are Type 89 Ko and Otsu), the Type 97 was named as Chi-Ha (Ha is the third letter of the Japanese alphabet). Note that Chi had not been used before Type 97. Before that, the code name of the Japanese tank is the simple sequential name like Yi-Go, Ha-Go.

Specifications
Weight 15 tons
Length 5.51m
Width 2.33m
Height 2.23m
Clearance .4m
Crew 4
Armor 8 to 33 mm
Armament One 47mm Type 1, 2 x 7.7mm Type 97 MG
Ammunition 120 rounds (47mm), 2745 rounds (7.7mm)
Speed 24.75 mph
Range 149 miles
Engine 170hp water cooled 6cyl Mitsubishi diesel

Type 98 Ke-Ni Light Tank
Type 98 Ke-Ni Light Tank

This was the successor to the Type 95 Light Tank. Only about 100 were produced before the war ended.


Type 1 Tank Destroyer Ho-Ni---Type 1 Tank Destroyer Ho-Ni---Type 1 Tank Destroyer Ho-Ni---Photo taken in 1989 at Aberdeen Proving Grounds. - Photo research by Dr. Georg V. Rauch. Photo courtesy of Dr. André Louis Maurois.
Type 1 Tank Destroyer Ho-Ni

Based on the Model 97 Tank, same specifications but with a 75mm cannon.


Type 1 Tank Destroyer Ho-Ni II
Type 1 Tank Destroyer Ho-Ni II

Based on the Model 97 Tank, same specifications but with a 105mm cannon.


Type 1 Chi-He Medium Tank
Type 1 Chi-He Medium Tank

A developement from the Type 97 Medium. Combat data unknown. Produced 15 trial production + 155 mass production

Specifications
Weight 17.2t
Crew 5
Length 5.73m
Width 2.33m
Height 2.38m
Min clearance 0.40m
Armor 50 - 25mm
Armament 47mm, 2 x MG
Engine Type 100 V12 Diesel, 240hp
Transmission 5 Forward, 1 reverse
Max speed 44km/h
Obstacle 2.50m Trench

Type 1 Ti-Ho Medium Tank---Type 1 Ti-Ho Medium Tank
Type 1 Ti-Ho Medium Tank

A developement from the Type 97 Medium. Combat data and numbers are unknown.


Type 1 Artillery Observation Vehicle
Type 1 Artillery Observation Vehicle


Type 1 Ho-Ro 15cm SPG---Type 1 Ho-Ro 15cm SPG
Type 1 Ho-Ro 15cm SPG

Based on the Model 97 Tank chassis. Built and deployed in small numbers, this self propelled gun mounted a 150mm howitzer.


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Type 2 Ke-To Light Tank

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Type 2 Medium Tank

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Type 2 No-Ni Tank Destroyer

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Type 2 Hoi Infantry Support Tank
Type 2 Hoi Infantry Support Tank

A developement from the Type 97 Medium. Total production was thirty units. The experimental model was based on the Type 97 Chi-Ha. The production model was based on the Type 3 Chi-Nu. Introduced in 1942, it was designed to provide close fire support. It was deployed to the IJA tank regiment's gun tank companies but no combat record is known.

Specifications
Weight 15.4 tons
Length 18' 7"
Height 8' 4"
Width 7' 6"
Crew 5
Armor 8 to 50mm
Armament One short barelled Type 99 75mm, One 7.7mm MG
Transmission 4 forward, 1 reverse
Performance 27 mph

Type 3 Ke-Ri Light Tank
Type 3 Ke-Ri Light Tank

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Type 3 Chi-Nu Medium Tank
Type 3 Chi-Nu Medium Tank

Medium tank development based on Chi-Ha was ended in Type 3 Chi-Nu. Only 66 of these tanks were ever built. It is unknown if they ever saw combat.

Specifications
Weight 18.8t
Length 5.73m
Width 2.33m
Height 2.38m
Min clearance 0.40m
Armor 50 - 25mm
Armament 75mm, 2 x MG
Engine Type 100 V12 Diesel, 240hp
Max speed 39km/h
Obstacle 2.50m Trench

Type 3 Ho-Ni III Tank Destroyer
Type 3 Ho-Ni III Tank Destroyer

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Type 4 Ke-Hy Light Tank

This design never went beyond prototype before the war ended.


Type 4 Ke-Nu Light Tank
Type 4 Ke-Nu Light Tank

Type 4 Ke-Nu was a light tank and it was produced and deployed in small numbers.


Type 4 Chi-To Medium Tank - here being looked over by an American serviceman after the war.---Type 4 Chi-To Medium Tank
Type 4 Chi-To Medium Tank

This design never went beyond prototype before the war ended. Chi-To's development began in 1942, to succeed Shinhoto Chi-Ha. In the first plan, the hull would be modified type of Chi-Ha, and main armament would be high velocity 57mm ATG. The plan changed in July 1943, to arm with 75mm high velocity cannon (copy of Bofors M29 75mm AAG) to catch up with world standard specification. So, it was decided that Chi-To would be designed all over again - from the ground up. The first prototype was finished in May 1944. Owing to war material priorities and other factors, only 6 were ever completed.

Specifications
Weight 30.0t
Crew 5
Length 6.73m
Width 2.87m
Height 2.87m
Min clearance 0.40m
Armor 75 - 35mm
Armament 75mm, 2 x MG
Engine Type 4 V12 Diesel with supercharger, 400hp
Max speed 45km/h
Obstacle 2.70m Trench

Type 4 Ha-To SPG
Type 4 Ha-To SPG

The Type 4 30cm SP Mortar "Ha-To" was developed in 1944. Ha-To had a Type 3 300mm Mortar, its weight of projectile was 170kg and the effective range was 3000m. Only 4 Ha-To were produced, and none of them were committed to war.

Specifications
Weight 14.3 tons
Length 6.8m
Width 2.4m
Height 2.75m
Clearance .4m
Crew 7
Armor 12 to 25 mm
Armament 300mm mortar
Ammunition ?
Speed 17mph
Range 74 miles
Engine 115hp water cooled 6cyl Mitsubishi gasoline

Type 4 120mm Ho-To SPG
Type 4 120mm Ho-To SPG

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Type 4 155mm Ho-Ro SPG
Type 4 155mm Ho-Ro SPG

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Type 5 Mortar Launcher "Tok"
Type 5 Mortar Launcher "Tok"


Type 5 Ke-Xo
Type 5 Ke-Xo

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Type 5 Chi-Re Medium Tank
Type 5 Chi-Re Medium Tank

This design never went beyond prototype before the war ended. 1 prototype produced. Another Type 5 variant either on plans or prototype stage was the Ho-Ri SPG.

Specifications
Weight 37.0 t sans main gun
Crew 5
Length 7.30 m
Width 3.05 m
Height 3.05 m
Min clearance 0.40 m
Armor 75 - 35 mm
Armament 75 mm same as Chi-To.
Chi-Ri's large turret was designed to mount Type 99 88mm AAG.
1 x 37mm on hull, 2 x MG
Engine Kawasaki Ha-9 V12 Gasoline, 550hp
Max speed 45km/h
Obstacle 2.80m Trench

75mm SPG "Kusae"
75mm SPG "Kusae"

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120mm Short Barrel Gun Tank
120mm Short Barrel Gun Tank

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Last Update: Thursday, February 13, 2003

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