A military power during the 17th century, Sweden has not participated in any war in almost two centuries. An armed neutrality was preserved in both World Wars. Sweden's long-successful economic formula of a capitalist system interlarded with substantial welfare elements has recently been undermined by high unemployment, rising maintenance costs, and a declining position in world markets. Indecision over the country's role in the political and economic integration of Europe caused Sweden not to join the EU until 1995, and to forgo the introduction of the euro in 1999. - US CIA World Factbook


PANSARTRUPPERNA
Armored troops

On October 1st 1942, Sweden's armored forces became an independent unit. It took over tank training from the infantry and later, the armored car training from the cavalry. Four peacetime regiments were formed:

P1 - Kungliga Göta Pansarlivgarde at Enköping, not formed until 1944
P2 - Kungliga Skånska Pansarregementet at Helsingborg, ex-K2
P3 - Kungliga Södermanlands Pansarregemente at Strängnäs, ex-I10
P4 - Kungliga Skaraborgs Pansarregemente at Skövde, ex-I9

Two training centers:
- Pansartruppskolan (PS) at P4, not formed until 1944 (Armored troops school)
- Pansartruppernas kadettskola at P3, later moved to P1 (Armored troops cadet school)

(Kungliga = Royal. Skåne, Södermanland and Skaraborg are countys in Sweden, pansarregemente=armored regiment).

In Sweden there were several industries with experience and ability of manufacturing components suitable for armored vehicles, or to assemble the vehicles - among them were:

Atlas-Diesel: Hydromechanical transmission
Avesta Jernverk: Armor plates
Bofors AB: Guns
Karlstads Mekaniska Verkstad: Mechanical transmissions, assembly of vehicles 
Landsverk AB: Assembly of vehicles, design
NOHAB: Assembly of vehicles
Scania-Vabis: Assembly of vehicles, engines
Volvo: Assembly of vehicles, engines

Special Note: Sweden, being neutral, did not provide arms to any warring nation during WWII. However, prior to the war, Sweden did sell their excellent Bofors cannon, armor, and blueprints to many nations.


Lynx---Lynx---L-180---Landsverk 181 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.---Landsverk 181 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.

L185---Landsverk185 chassis - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.---Landsverk 185 - Photo thanks to IonFonosch.

---Armored cars from the K3 armored car squadron in 1937, of unknown kind. The front vehicle is probably not armored.---Armored cars in 10 april 1940 during the swedish mobilization, when Germany invaded Denmark and Norway. Vehicle type is unknown.---A Swedish armored car on maneuvers in The Netherlands.---Landsverk 210 Armored Motorcycle - Photo thanks to IonFonosch.---Landsverk 210 Armored Motorcycle - Photo thanks to IonFonosch.

Pansarbil m/26---M26 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.---M26 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.

Pansarbil m/31 manufatured by landsverk. 30 were produced.---M31 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.---M25 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.

Pansarbil fm/29 the pitcure is taken during an manuver in 1935 in southern Sweden (skåne).---FM29 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.---FM29 chassis - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.---FM29 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.
Armored cars in Sweden 1926-45

Not only tanks were acquired in the 1920s. Three experimental armored cars were built in the mid 1920s by Tidaholm firm, they were designated Pansarbil m/26. They served with K3 cavalry regiment. They were built on Tidaholm truck chassis, and probably used iron plates instead of armor plates. A heavy armored car weighing some 8 tons were developed in 1929. It was known as L-170 or Pansarbil fm/29. It was ready in spring of 1932 and it had a 85hp engine providing a maximum speed of 60km/h, but the vehicle was too heavy and expensive so it was dropped. A more realistic project had to be developed in the early 1930s, as the need of armored cars grew more and more. The cavalry needed training vehicles for maneuvers and in June 1931 Bofors got an order of a Pansarbil m/31, built on a 2-ton Chevrolet truck. It was delivered in August the same year. It was accepted and a series of 30 vehicles built on Chevrolet and Volvo chassis were later ordered from Landsverk AB. They were delivered during 1933-34, and the total weight was 4.2 tons. Armament consisted of a 8mm m/14-29 MG to the right of the driver, and on the loading platform at the rear was installed either a 37mm marine gun m/98B behind an armor plate or double 8mm m/36 MGs which could be moved from side to side. They were organized in armored car troops in 4 cavalry regiments at K1, K2, K3 and K4. Pansarbil m/31 were the only armored car in service with the Swedish army up to 1940, and by then only 19 of them were operational. However in 1942, decisions are taken to rearm Pansarbil m/31 with a 20mm Bofors automatic cannon m/40B, with a coaxially mounted 8mm m/14-29 MG. Along with the order of 104 tanks in September 1939, it was also proposed to acquire 30 new armored cars. This were permitted, and Landsverk which already had developed a new modern armored car for export was chosen. This was the Lynx armored car, and delivery was fast. The Lynx were also sold to Denmark in small numbers. In August 1940, some 15 Lynx armored cars which had been ordered by Denmark were taken by the Swedish government. They were designated Pansarbil m/39 and was put in use by the Swedish army. Another 30 vehicles were then ordered from Volvo, and they were designated Pansarbil m/40. Pansarbil m/40 were issued to cavalry regiments in Stockholm, Helsingborg, Skövde and Umeå. After export of war material had been stopped, five Landsverk L-180 ordered by Ireland were taken by the Swedish governmet. The Swedish army then used them under the designation Pansarbil m/41. This was the famous Landsverk L-180, used by Denmark, Estonia, Ireland, The Netherlands, and also Germany who captured few vehicles from Denmark and The Netherlands. The Swedish version had a Lynx turret with a 20mm automatic cannon, instead of the more common turret with a 37mm Bofors gun. An unknown number of Lynx armored cars were sold to the Dominican Republic in 1960s.


Stridsvagn m/21 (Strv fm/22) - Stridsvagn fm/22 #2 on the exercise field of I10 Regt.---m/21 with crew and troop, 1928------

Stridsvagn m/21-29 - Diagram research thanks to Ion Fonosch.---M21 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch---M21 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch---M21-29 upgrade - Ion Fonosch
Stridsvagn m/21-29

The LK-II was designed as Germany's response to the English 'Whippet' tank of WWI. Designed just before WW1 ended, only test models were assembled. In the greatest secrecy, they were imported in parts as steam plates and tractor details. After the reconstruction of the vehicles, trials were held at Svea and Göta Livgarde. The tanks had the designation Stridsvagn fm/22, shortly thereafter being known as Stridsvagn m/21. First in 1928, organized trials were held with Göta Livgarde Tank Battalion. Sweden bought 10 tanks in Autumn of 1921. The Strv m/21-29 was a modernised version of the normal m/21. The exterior differences are clearly visable with a new style engine muffler and the hood over the radiator. The interior differences are a new motor, a Swedish Scania Vabis 1554 with 85hp that gave the vehicle 2 km/h more speed. The renovations did start in the begining of the thirties (but the name suggests 1929. Perhaps that is when blueprints were drawn or the idea began).

Specifications
Weight 9.7tons
Length 5.7m
Height 2.52m
Width 2.05m
Crew 4
Armor 4 - 14mm
Performance 18km/h
Armament 1 MG m/14-29

---
Renault tanks in Sweden

In the Autumn of 1923 a Renault FT-17 were bought from France. Already at delivery, the vehicle was very worn down and its performance was poor. It was nicknamed "Putte", and it was used for testing communication equipment, there are photos of the tank having large antennaes. It was withdrawn from service in August 1926, and ended up as range target for the artillery the following month. The 37mm L/21 gun included with the delivery were used for trials with Stridsvagn m/21.

In January 1928, an improved FT-17 tank were bought from France. It was the Renault NC 27, and it was designated in Sweden as Stridsvagn fm/28. This had many failures in clutch and transmission, and were found unsuitable. Later on it was mainly used for drivers training at Göta Livgardes tank battalion. This vehicle is preserved at Pansarmuseet at Axvall, and is the only vehicle left in the world. Though tested, the Renault NC 27 (Stridsvagn fm/28) was never adoped by the Swedish Army.



Carden-Loyd tankettes in Sweden

In 1931 two tankettes were bought from Great Britain. It was one Carden-Loyd Mk V Star, and one Carden-Loyd Mk VI. They were bought to be tested as towing vehicles for Bofors new 37mm infantry gun. In the beginning they were known as Traktor nr 52 and Traktor nr 53. During 1935, the tankettes were fitted with a m/14-29 MG and then equipped Göta Livgarde tank battalion under the designation Light tank m/Carden-Loyd. Here they were used as reconnaissance vehicles as they were bound to road travelling. Probably withdrawn from service in 1939, when they were given to the Swedish Army Museum. Both tankettes are preserved at Pansarmuseet at Axvall. The Mk V Star being a unique vehicle, it is the only vehicle of its kind that is left in the world.


Stridsvagn fm/31 on its tracks---Stridsvagn fm/31 on its wheels---Landsverk 30 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.---Landsverk 30 - Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch.
Landsverk L30 - Stridsvagn fm/31

The Landsverk Wheel - Track tanks were developed from 1929 onward. The first model was Landsverk L-5 which was developed with German financing by German designers. Single prototype was tested in Kazan, Russia. After the Landsverk L-5 in 1931, L-30 and L-80 were designed. The Landsverk L-80 was the successor of the L-30, built in prototype form in 1933. It was lighter and smaller than the L-30, but faster on both wheels and tracks. The W/T construction was similar to that of the L-30 design. After the L-80 no further development of this kind of tanks were undertaken in Sweden. The L-30 and L-80 were later offered on the open market. These W/T tanks were the ground and bottom of experiences gained at Landsverk AB, which later on stood for most of Swedens own tank production. In 1931, Lansverk Strv fm/31 was designed. The traction system could be changed from the inside without the need of leaving the tank. This required complicated mechanisms, which increased the weight and cost of the vehicle. Single chassis with a dummy turret was ordered along with the three Stridsvagn m/31. The vehicle was delivered in in 1935, and it was standardized by the Swedish army as Stridsvagn fm/31 - fm for försöksmodell or testing vehicle. It was found unsuitable and was never adopted.

Specifications
Weight 11.5tons
Length 5.2m
Width 2.45m
Height 2.5m
Crew 3
Armor 6 - 14mm
Engine Maybach DSO 8
V12 - 150hp
Performance 35km/h - track
75km/h - wheel
Armament 37mm Bofors gun
2 x 6.5mm MG

Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch---Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch
Landsverk L5

No details are known.


Landsverk L10 - Stridsvagn m/31---Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch---Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch
Landsverk L10 - Stridsvagn m/31

Landsverk L-10 were developed in parallel with Landsverk L-30. It was a very modern design for its time (early 1930s), equipped with a quick-firing 37mm anti-tank gun and radio. 3 vehicles were ordered in late 1931, and they were delivered in late 1935. They were designated Stridsvagn m/31 by the Swedish army, and they saw limited usage before being replaced by more modern Landsverk tanks. One vehicle is preserved at Pansarmuseet at Axvall, Sweden - while the others have disappeared.

Specifications
Weight 11.5tons
Length 5.2m
Width 2m
Height 2.22m
Crew 4
Armor 8 - 24mm
Engine Maybach DSO 8
V12 - 150hp
Performance 40km/h
Armament 37mm Bofors gun
2 x 6.5mm MG

prototype during trials
Landsverk L-100

Prototype design from Landsverk. In 1933-34, ultra-light tanks weighing less than 5 tons drew attention. The Landsverk L-100 was designed in 1934, it weighed 4.5tons and was armed with single MG. Possessed a maximum speed of 55km/h. Never used by the Swedish army. The Landsverk L-101 which actually preceded the L-100 was a proposal of an ultra-light tank destroyer armed with a 20mm automatic cannon. However this project was dropped after the first drawing-board studies.


Stridsvagn m/37 in Skåne county, 1940.---photo by Steven Guy---photo by Steven Guy---Photo taken at the Beltring 2000 show in England. Source: Wheels & Tracks magazine #73
Stridsvagn m/37

Developed from the Czech CKD AH-IV tank. The AH-IV was popular with other nations such as Romania and Iran. The vehicle was considered to have a superior suspension system. Sweden ordered 48 AH-IV-Sv in mid 1930s. Two vehicles were Czech-built, the other 46 were built with license by Jungner firm in Oskarshamn. A total of 48 tanks were delivered to the Swedish army between 1938 (some sources state 1937) and 1939. Stridsvagn m/37 had a riveted construction armed with two 8mm m/36 machine-guns. AB Volvo provided the engine, transmission, and tracks. The tanks were used for infantry support and reconnaissance roles, later they served as Staff tanks. They served at I2 regt. (Göta Livgarde) in Stockholm, but was transfered to I9 regt. and I10 regt. in 1939. In October 1942, all of them were transfered to I18/P1G on Gotland. Stridsvagn m/37 were withdrawn from service in 1953. Known examples that have survived; total of 8, 4 of them still in running order. The commander (who was also the gunner and loader) controlled the movement of his cupola by the turning of his head.

The center photos are by Steven Guy. About this tank, Steven Guy writes: "I had a talk to the people involved with the vehicle and they informed me that they did not work the tank to hard but it seemed to go all right on the flat ground. It may have been different if they had took it over some lumps and bumps (this was in reply to my question about how well the 85hp engine moved the vehicle). The gunner had a leather strap going between his legs front to back and I was told it was called the "Diaper" by the crew. The machine guns were just mock ups and there was no parts inside the turret which gave more room to the commander. After retiring from active service the tank ended up as a tow vehicle for targets on the firing range. From the mid 1960s the tank became a monument near the camp at the range. In 1970 some soldiers from the tank company managed to get it back into running condition again. In the late 1970s the Brigadier decided that the tank should be brought back into the regiment and be kept in running condition by a voluntary crew at the Regimental Museum. In 1992 a week before the Regimental parade one rod came out through the engine, but thanks to some enthusiasts, the tank was running the next Saturday with a new engine. Proud over the success, the tank was dismantled again in order to make a total restoration. From August 1999 - May 2000 a team of 5 enthusiasts with help of another 7 have been working for more than 2000 hours to get the tank to the condition it is now in. The tank is kept in the Regimental Museum Strangnas, Sweden."

Specifications
Weight 4.5tons
Length 3.4m
Width 1.85m
Height 1.95m
Crew 2
Engine 6 cyl OHV petrol engine, 85 bhp, Volvo type FC-CKD
Performance 60km/h (38mph)
Armament 2 x 8mm m/36 TMG
Armor 6 - 15mm
Transmission 5 speed Praga-Wilson preselected gearbox.

Landsverk L60B
Landsverk L60B

(no details)


Landsverk L60C
Landsverk L60C

(no details)



Landsverk L60D

(no details)


Landsverk L60S - Stridsvagn m/38
Landsverk L60S - Stridsvagn m/38

In 1934, two slightly different light tanks designated Landsverk L-60 and 100 were produced. Both featured an excellent suspension system, relatively high speed, and well designed shape. Hungary purchased the Landsverk L-60 tank and produced and used them under the designation M38 Toldi I. Two L-60 were sold to Ireland where they still are preserved, one were sold to Austria - fate unknown. Landsverk L-60-S tanks, in Swedish service, after certain modifications were designated as Stridsvagn m/38. 16 tanks were ordered in September 1937, along with 48 AH-IV-Sv also known as Stridsvagn m/37. The 16 Stridsvagn m/38 were delivered during 1938-39. These 16 tanks were the only vehicles capable of engaging armored targets until early 1941, as all other tanks were MG-armed. They were numbered #61-77, where #62 was the prototype vehicle built up of iron plates. Stridsvagn m/38 first served at Göta Livgarde, but were transfered to two tank battalions at I9 regt. at Skövde and I10 regt. at Strängnäs in 1939. In 1943, all were transfered once again to the newly formed P2 regt. They were withdrawn from service in 1957. Today, Stridsvagn m/38 #66 is on display at Pansarmuseet at Axvall, Sweden.


Stridsvagn m/39
Stridsvagn m/39

Improved L-60-SI tanks were ordered by the Swedish army. 20 Stridsvagn m/39 were ordered on December 19th 1939. Stridsvagn m/39 was quite similar to Stridsvagn m/38, but it had a modified gun shield now housing two machine-guns. It also used steering levers, even though the Stridsvagn m/38 which originally had a steering wheel also were modernized with steering levers in mid 1940s. They were delivered during the spring of 1941. In May 1941 it was decided to up-armor the new tanks, and another 35mm could be fitted during wartimes. In peacetime this extra armor were never used, as the extra weight made the vehicles wore down a lot faster. Stridsvagn m/39 were first used by I9 regt and I10 regt., but were in the spring of 1942 some were transfered to K2 in Helsingborg which were forming an armored regiment (P2). I March 1943, P3 (ex-I10) handed over their vehicles to P4 (ex-I9) regt. They were withdrawn from service along with other types in 1957.

Specifications
Weight 8.7tons
----------
8.95 tons (extra armor)
Length 4.8m
Width 2.07m
Height 2.05m
Crew 3
Armor 6 - 15mm
----------
6 - 50mm
Engine Scania-Vabis 1664
142hp
Performance 45km/h
Armament 37mm Bofors m/38
2 x 8mm m/36 TMG

Stridsvagn m/40L #367
Stridsvagn m/40L

In March 1940, some 90 TNH-Sv were ordered from CKD but they were never delivered due to the German occupation of Czechoslovakia. It was decided to order 100 L-60-SII from AB Landsverk. The contract was signed in winter of 1940, and the tank were designated Stridsvagn m/40L (L=Landsverk). Due to problems with supplies of transmissions and guns, the last Strv m/40L were not delivered until December of 1942. The decision taken in May 1941 of adding 35mm extra armor to Strv m/39 also counted for the Strv m/40L. Only the transmission and air intakes differed these tanks from eachother. Stridsvagn m/40L was the first tank built in quantity with hydrodynamical pre-selective gearbox. Strv m/40L were issued ti I9 and I10 regts, but were transfered to K2 in 1942. When the Swedish armored forces became independent in 1943, most vehicles were transfered to P4 regt. They were withdrawn from service in 1957, but in 1960 some 20 vehicles were sold to the Dominican republic.


Stridsvagn m/40K outside city of Karlstad, 1944.---Photos from Bovington Tank Museum - Courtesy of Olaf Schiltmans

---Photos from Bovington Tank Museum - Courtesy of Olaf Schiltmans---Photos from Bovington Tank Museum - Courtesy of Olaf Schiltmans---Photos from Bovington Tank Museum - Courtesy of Olaf Schiltmans---Photos from Bovington Tank Museum - Courtesy of Olaf Schiltmans

Photos from Bovington Tank Museum - Courtesy of Olaf Schiltmans---Photos from Bovington Tank Museum - Courtesy of Olaf Schiltmans---Photos from Bovington Tank Museum - Courtesy of Olaf Schiltmans---Photos from Bovington Tank Museum - Courtesy of Olaf Schiltmans
Stridsvagn m/40K

With a new organisation in summer of 1943, a need for over 200 tanks arised. Since Scania-Vabis had no capability to build over 200 tanks, the construction was to be cut in half. In June 1942, 80 Strv m/40 were ordered from Landsverk and 122 Strv m/41 from Scania-Vabis. The 80 m/40 tank were to be built with license by Kalrstads Mechanical Workshop, and these were sligttly improved m/40L tanks. The tanks were designated Stridsvagn m/40K (K=Karlstad), and they had homogen armor up to 50mm thickness. The last Strv m/40K was not delivered until September 1944. They were located to P2 regt. in Helsingborg and were included with the 8th Armored Brigade. One 40 K was in the early 50s rearmed with a 57mm AT-gun m/43, designated Pvkv II. Strv m/40 K was withdrawn from service in 1957.

Specifications
Weight 11 tons
Crew 3
Armor (max) 24 mm
Armament 37 mm, 2 MG
Engine 160hp
Top Speed 28 mph

Stridsvagn m/41 preserved at Pansarmuseet at Axvall, Sweden. - Photo: Thorleif Olsson---Stvr M/41 on war games. - Photo taken in 1942.
Stridsvagn m/41

Since 1937, the Swedish army had been interested in Czech-built TNH tank. In March 1940, some 90 tanks were ordered from CKD firm. They were never delivered as the German authorities needed them for its coming campign in the East. After negotiations with German authorities, Scania-Vabis were allowed to built their own tanks under license. In June 1941, 116 Stridsvagn m/41 SI were ordered. These were delivered from December 1942 - August 1943. Stridsvagn m/41 were riveted, which made construction easier. Just as the Strv m/38-Strv m/40, it was armed with a 37mm Bofors m/38 gun, and the first batch had the same engine as Strv m/40L, Scania-Vabis type 1664. In June 1942, a further 122 Stridsvagn m/41 were ordered, now under the designation Strv m/41 SII. They had thicker frontal armor and Scanias new engine of type L 603. The first SII vehicles were delivered in October 1943. The last 16 of the 122 ordered, were rebuilt to assualt guns (Sav m/43) and the production ceased of SII ceased in March 1944 when 106 vehicles had been delivered. The SI tanks were located to P3 regt. in Strängnäs, where they equipped the 10th Armored Brigades light tank companies. The SII tanks were mainly located to the 9th Armored Brigade at P4 regt. in Skövde, while others belonged to the reserve of the P2 and P3 regts. They were painted in a three-color camoflauge. Stridsvagn m/41 were used until late 1950s, when they were rebuilt to APCs under the designation Pbv 301.

Specifications
Weight 11tons
Length 4.6m
Width 2.14m
Height 2.35m
Crew 4
Armor 8 - 50 mm
Engine Scania-Vabis
type L603
160hp
Performance 42km/h
Armament 37mm Bofors
two 8mm m/39 MG

Stridsvagn m/42 TH #632
Stridsvagn m/42

By late 1930s, the Hungarian army ordered a 16-ton tank known as Lago from Landsverk AB. Lago was the result of further improvements of the L-60. The army needs for a bigger and better tank resulted in that 100 modifed Lagos were ordered in November 1941. It was designated Stridsvagn m/42, and was a fully modern tank for its time. It was armed with a 75mm L/34 gun, having adequate effect on armored and soft targets. (About the same effect as 75mm StuK37 L/24 gun used by early StuG IIIs). The tank were well protected and had good mobility. In January 1942 another 60 Stridsvagn m/42 were ordered. This time they were to be built with license by Volvo, and 55 of them are fitted with Scania engines while the last five are equipped with a newly developed Volvo engine. All 60 vehicles had hydrualic gearboxes instead of the elctromagnetical in the first batch. To differ the variants from eachother, they are designated; Strv m/42 and E (one engine), M (electromagnetical gearbox), H (hydrualic gearbox). By the end of June 1942, a further 80 vehicles are ordered from Landsverk, 70 m/42 TH and 10 m/42 EH. In addition, some 42 m/42 EH are ordered from Volvo. The first of the 282 ordered Strv m/42 were delivered in April 1943, and the last in January 1945. The equipped the heavy tank companies of the armored brigades, but were replaced during the 1950s by Stridsvagn 81, the Swedish designation on Centurion Mk. III. In 1957, 235 of TM and TH variants are rebuilt to Stridsvagn 74, while EH vehicles were transfered to infantry-gun vehicles as Ikv 73.

Specifications
Weight 22.5tons
Length 6.21m
Width 2.34m
Height 2.58m
Crew 4
Engine 2 x Scania-Vabis
type L603
320hp
------
1 x Volvo
type A8B
380hp
Performance 42km/h
Armament 75mm m/41 gun
four 8mm m/39 MG

Stormartillerivagn m/43 (Sav m/43) - Assault gun model 1943
Stormartillerivagn m/43 (Sav m/43) - Assault gun model 1943

Sav m/43 were built in 36 examples by Scania-Vabis. It was based on Stridsvagn m/41 SII chassis (TNHP-Sv). Originally it was armed with a 75mm gun, but it was replaced by a 105mm m/44 gun. It was first issued to the artillery (A9 regt. in Kristinehamn), but were later transfered to the armored forces in 1951. One only held training of the vehicles though, and so they were used by infantry brigades special company of 6 vehicles per brigade. Sav m/43 remained in the infantrys assault gun companies until 1973.

Specifications
Weight 12.4tons
Length 5.05m
Width 2.14m
Height 2.29m
Crew 4
Engine Scania-Vabis
type 1664
140hp
Performance 43km/h (max)
Armament 105mm m/44 gun

Pvkv m/43 at Axvall. The tank to the right is a Ikv 73.---a 1946 or 47 modernized version.
Pansarvärnskanonvagn m/43 - Tank destroyer model 1943

In 1942 some 87 Pvkv m/43 were ordered from Landsverk AB. The chassis of Strv m/42 EH were used to build the Pvkv m/43. Mounting a 75mm m/43 L/50.5 AT-gun made the nose heavy, and the track arrangement were strengthened. The gun had restricted side elevation, and 56 rounds were carried. It had a muzzle velocity of 815m/s. The gun had good penetration power, and it was tested during firing trials on Swedens King Tiger tank which were acquired from France. Also a 8mm m/39 MG were used for close defense. The crew of 4 only had protection against small-arms fire, and in the beginning the superstructure had no roof armor. Delivery was to start in Autumn of 1944, but after problems with supplies of transmissions Pvkv m/43 were delivered to brigades during 1946-47. They were modifid in late 1940s, and a roof over the fighting compartment were built on. Another modification were made in early 1960s by replacing engines etc.


Luftvärnskanonvagn fm/43 - AA-tank model 1943
Luftvärnskanonvagn fm/43 - AA-tank model 1943

Earlier Sweden had exported Landsverk Anti-II vehicles to Finland. When the development of this vehicle began, it was probably worlds best anti-aircraft tank having outstanding armament. In Germany there were few designs, but they did not have the great armament as on on Lvkv fm/43. The allies never developed their AA-vehicles due to their superiority in the air. One had understood how unprotected armored vehicles were against fighter aircrafts or so called tank busters. The Swedish armored forces were very badly protected against attacks from the air, så the need for this Lvkv was huge. The vehicle were based on a modified chassis of a Stridsvagn m/42. The chassis were shortened and only singel Scania L 603 engine was fitted. Armament consisted of 2 x 40mm Bofors automatic cannon L/60, and 326 rounds were stowed. The turrets were built by AB Bofors and were sent via rail to AB Landsverk, where they were assembled. Delivery of 17 Lvkv fm/43 to the Swedish army took place between 1948-49.


Landsverk "ANTI" AA Tank
Landsverk "ANTI" AA Tank

(no details)


Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch
Bofors FM32 Artillery Tractor

(no details)

Specifications
Weight ?
Length ?
Width ?
Height ?
Crew 1
Engine 46hp
Performance 6km/h (max)
Armament none

Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch
Landsverk 131 Artillery Tractor

(no details)


Photo thanks to Ion Fonosch
Landsverk 132 Artillery Tractor

(no details)


People who helped make this section possible.

Thorleif Olsson
Thorleif Olsson

Olaf Schiltmans
Olaf Schiltmans

David Barrett
David Barrett

Daniella Carlsson
Daniella Carlsson

Steven Guy
Author of
Thunder And Steel

Ionica Fonosch
Ionica Fonosch

Bill Morran

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Last Update: Thursday, February 13, 2003

Gustavus Adolphus - 1594 to 1632. Considered wise and fair by those who knew him. Known as the "Lion Of The North" because of his bravery by leading his soldiers from the front. Creator of the modern professional solder, command structures, integrated arms, and supply system. He is considered the "Father of Modern Warfare".

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